Sharif Don’t Like It
June 24th, 2011

Sharif Don’t Like It

By now I’m sure you’ve all heard about the Superman #712 fiasco, so we’ll just leave this at that (but the link’s there for you if you like).

POINTS OF INTEREST!
1) We made a new show for CATV (that is to say, ComicsAlliance Television) bringing together the worlds of the X-Men and Game of Thrones. It was immediately called a failure by Steven! You be the judge!

2) This is wonderful.

3) Euge (aka: Eugene Ahn, Adam WarRock, Peanut) has a show in Charlotte this Sunday night that looks to be pretty amazing. If you are anywhere near, you should go. Details.

4) If you’re into that sort of thing, you can listen to Matt Fraction call us “disingenuous and fraudulent” on an excellent, all-new episode of War Rocket Ajax.

Have a good weekend everybody, and remember: Wherever you go, there you are… and should you go to our store, please buy something.

xo
ch

^ 8 Comments...

  1. Koltreg

    but… isn’t Mogo a moon and a Green Lantern (also a polygamist)?

    [Reply]

  2. Solon

    ROCK THE CASBAH!!!

    [Reply]

  3. Revolverhawk

    Here is my comment on the Sarif issue: I am glad that D.C. was planning to put in more Islam super heroes. But I am annoyed they were going to portray the average American as a bigot who didn’t want his help in that story. D.C. billed Superman #712 as a story where Superman goes to Los Angeles and meets the West Coast’s newest super-hero, Sharif, a young man dealing with a public that might not want his help. The “Islam Super Hero” Thing is awesome. Depicting the average American as a bigot is not. It isn’t justified either: Our President’s middle name is Hussein. I am not objecting to his name or his status as President, And I know he is actually Christian… just pointing out that people here are not bigoted against Arabs or Muslims. It’s great that D.C. wants to be more inclusive, but including more minorities while simultaneously committing acts of bigotry against the average American, showing us in a truly horrible manner, is a classic example of one step forward, one step back. It’s possible the comic got the axe, not because the character is Muslim- since Nightrunner is also Muslim- but just because the comic depicted the average American in a very negative way- which would actually justify canceling the comic.

    [Reply]

  4. JoJo

    I would like one Hadji roll, please. With unsweetened tea.

    [Reply]

  5. Jordjevic

    “Our President’s middle name is Hussein”

    Yeah, which is something absolutely nobody used to disparage and stir up casual racism against him in the run-up to the election, right?

    Roberson’s story wasn’t written in a void. Remember this?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NutFkykjmbM
    Most “Average Americans” aren’t racists or bigots, sure, but a distrust of Muslims has become deeply ingrained in our culture. Would there really be nobody acting like that if the Muslim in question was flying around with super-strength and wearing crescent moons on his chest?
    In short, how is “It’ll make the majority uncomfortable” a valid justification?

    [Reply]

  6. Ziah Grace

    On another note, is the whole “kitty thing” just the end of that story? I haven’t heard anyone actually buy it, but that seems to be the “official” story. Also, I think it’d best to have islamic characters introduced without fanfare like the gay couple in The Walking Dead. (Not comparing homosexuality to islam, just using a parallel)

    [Reply]

  7. New Mutant

    ROCK the Casbah! ROCK the Casbah!

    [Reply]

  8. Revolverhawk

    Response to Jordjevic: In a group or area of millions of people- like Orange County- it is inevitable there will be some bigots, simply due to the sheer number of people there. I don’t object to the idea that there are some bigots in Los Angeles Sarif would encounter, I object to the idea that the public in general hates him. There is a difference between a small number of people being bigoted, and the public in general being bigoted. It is a question of percentage. D.C. didn’t bill it as a comic where he encounters a hate group, but rather a comic where the public hates him in general. Encountering a hate group is realistic, having the public in general hate him is not.

    [Reply]

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